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Selected publications

The Future of the European Project
The Future of the European Project
by Thierry Chopin, Jean-François Jamet
DGAPanalyse 8, September 15, 2016, 14 pp. (in German)
At the EU summit on September 16 in Bratislava, 27 heads of state and government sought to show that the European Union would be facing the future together, despite the outcome of the British referendum to leave the EU. Thierry Chopin of the Fondation Robert Schuman and economist Jean-François Jamet describe how factors that previously brought unity to the European project have fallen by the wayside. They also suggest how these can be found again.
Moving Forward with the EU-Enlargement Process (2015)
Moving Forward with the EU-Enlargement Process (2015)The TRAIN 2015 Programme’s focus on strengthening of democratic institutions in the countries of the Western Balkans
by
This year’s TRAIN Programme brought together think tanks from the Western Balkan region to discuss the overarching topic “Strengthening of Democratic Institutions” and its key role in European integration. The fight against corruption in state institutions, police integrity and a reform of the public administration were among the subtopics participants addressed. They presented their findings and recommendations to policy makers in Brussels as well as in their respective countries.
Reforming the G20
Reforming the G20The “Think 20 Network” makes recommendations for the 2014 G20 summit in Australia
by Katharina Gnath, Claudia Schmucker
Think20 Papers 2014, pp. 43-48
As the main international forum for economic coordination, the G20 is expected to contribute substantially to global economic stability. At its heart is the Framework for Strong, Sustainable, and Balanced Growth, by which the G20 countries have agreed to coordinate their economic policies ever more closely. Katharina Gnath and Claudia Schmucker put forward recommendations for improving monitoring in their Think20 Paper, “Strengthening the Peer Review of the G20 Mutual Assessment Process.”
From the West of the Balkans to “the Rest of the Balkans"?
From the West of the Balkans to “the Rest of the Balkans"?Croatia’s EU entry opens up opportunities for South Eastern Europe but harbors the danger of new dividing lines, too
by Theresia Töglhofer
DGAPanalyse 8, September 5, 2013, 24 pp.
Croatia is the first of the Western Balkan countries to gain entry into the European Union. It is an encouraging signal for the region’s other contenders; if they fulfill the requirements for political and economic reforms, Brussels will honor its membership promises. At the same time, however, a new border is running through the region. Particularly in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the growing distance in the EU integration process is becoming a problem. The author warns against losing sight of the regional context.
State Power within European Integration
State Power within European IntegrationOn the limits and context of Germany’s power in the Union
by Josef Janning
DGAPkompakt 1, May 14, 2013, 9 pp.
Josef Janning presents five theses on power in the European Union today. Germany is widely seen as calling the shots in the management of Europe’s sovereign debt crisis, and maybe in the EU in general. While one state’s influence within the Union is complex and contextual, state power has clearly regained prominence in the European debate. How much power have member states retained, or perhaps even won, in the process of integration? What does power in the EU look like today?
France: The Paralyzed Country
France: The Paralyzed CountryClaire Demesmay on Franco-German tensions and the economic crisis next door
by Claire Demesmay
Five Questions, May 6, 2012
The mountain of French debt continues to grow. So does unemployment. Competitiveness remains a weak point. Germany’s most important partner in the EU is in deep economic crisis. President François Hollande has now been in office for a full year, but French approval ratings for him have fallen sharply. Germans are concerned not only about the French government’s reform efforts, which are far from successful, but also by the anti-German comments coming from within Hollande’s Socialist Party.
Time Is Running Out for a Two-State Solution
Time Is Running Out for a Two-State SolutionAndreas Reinicke, EU special representative for the Middle East peace process, on the plans for a new US initiative
by Andreas Reinicke
DGAP Interview, May 3, 2013
Efforts to find a solution to the Middle East crisis are slowly moving into gear again. This March, US President Obama visited Israel and the Palestinian territories. John Kerry, his new secretary of state, is ready to mediate between the two opponents. Both the US and the EU are holding on to the goal of a two-state solution. “But we don’t know how much longer the window will stay open. The time will come when this option is no longer realistic,” said Andreas Reinicke in an interview with DGAP.
Afghanistan after 2014: How Can Reconstruction Succeed?
Afghanistan after 2014: How Can Reconstruction Succeed?Regional cooperation is the key to long-term stability. A new publication in the DGAP publication series
by Henning Riecke, Kevin Francke
Partners for Stability, Involving Neighbors in Afghanistan's Reconstruction - Transatlantic Approaches, DGAP-Schriften zur Internationalen Politik, Nomos Verlag, March 2013, 280 pp.
The withdrawal of international security forces is fully underway and will be complete by 2014. Although the Allies will not turn their backs on the country entirely, responsibility for regional security will now rest largely with Afghanistan and its neighbors. The problems are substantial – from the drug trade to terrorism. Moreover, neighboring countries and external actors have opposing interests. This DGAP volume (in English) brings together experts from Europe, the US, and Central Asia.
Strengthening International Governance
Strengthening International GovernanceIn the 2013 DGAP Yearbook, 80 experts describe ways for the state to regain its ability to take action
by Josef Braml, Stefan Mair, Eberhard Sandschneider
Diplomatisches Magazin 3, March 2013, p. 38-39
Not only have the financial and debt crises led to massive economic problems. They have also dramatically restricted the state’s ability to act. Up until now the response has been half-hearted, the efforts of nations to go it alone have been enormous, and the reach of WTO regulations has been minimal. Expectations are therefore high for politically and economically stable Germany. The latest DGAP Yearbook gives valuable insight into how Berlin should handle its new leadership role.
Leaving the Moral High Ground
Leaving the Moral High GroundValues and interests in the German foreign policy debate
by Eberhard Sandschneider
Eberhard Sandschneider, head of the DGAP’s research institute, responds to an article in the German weekly DIE ZEIT by Jörg Lau, "The German Love of Dictators," in which Lau criticized German foreign policy makers for their friendliness toward dictators and "half-democrats.”
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